April 17-18, 2015
Kansas City, Missouri
Join us as we explore beauty's role in saving the world.
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The top photo is of This is broken . . . This is beautiful installation.
Bottom photo is of the work of Dylan Mortimer for the In War and at Peace: Artists in Practice Exhibit.

Exhibits

Installation

This is broken . . . This is beautiful . . . is an interactive installation by Ted Lyddon Hatten scheduled for the Dale Patton Schoolhouse, on the campus of William Jewell College, Liberty, Missouri. This piece, in conjunction with Restoration Art Conference, aims to explore the salvific power of beauty.

With the fractures of our broken world rapidly spreading, can beauty restore wholeness? Can it heal? Prince Myshkin, Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s hero in The Idiot, famously asserts, Beauty will save the world. If beauty has the power to redeem, how can we nurture that process? What might happen if we place our brokenness in a context of beauty?

This interactive, ephemeral mosaic offers the viewer an opportunity to consider the relationship between beauty and brokenness and add to an unfolding, collaborative, visual conversation. Together, we will name the spectrum of brokenness in our world as we look for a glimpse of the restorative power of beauty.

This is broken . . . This is beautiful . . . will be up April 15 - May 20.

Art Exhibit

IN WAR AND AT PEACE: ARTISTS IN PRACTICE

As faith mysteriously reconciles the course of history with one’s way of life in the present and hoped for future, art also (both in its making and in its perceiving) reconciles the past, present, and future by taking a specific form composed by specific materials in a specific time. Art carves out a unique space for imaginative hope.

2014 marked the centennial anniversary of World War I. To commemorate a special time of remembrance, New York City curator Meaghan Ritchey has partnered with the Kansas City arts community and Restoration Arts to present this pre-conference show "In War and at Peace: Artists at Practice." This show will grapple with the dehumanizing effects of war: themes of chaos, destruction, and loss of life alongside works which seek to remind us of peacetime, harmony, and mutuality, and charity.

This exhibit includes the works of: Ricky Allman, Jeran Avery. David Ford, Jim Leedy, Judith G. Levy, Linda Lighton, Dylan Mortimer and John Ochs.

The Gallery at 1708 Baltimore Ave.
Thursday, April 16, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Kansas City, Missouri